Ant-Man and the Wasp Spoiler Review

Ant-Man and the Wasp Spoiler Review

Posted by on Jul 10, 2018 in Home, News, Opinion, Uncategorized

Ant Man and the Wasp, sequel to 2015’s Ant Man, reminds us that not every comic book movie needs to be about saving the entire world. The world can be interpreted as protecting a community, a city, or even the world represented by an individual’s life and those connected to them. When Ant Man was an Edgar Wright project, the former writer/director envisioned his movie to be a standalone film that wasn’t connected to the mainstream Marvel Cinematic Universe. Although some of his vision changed when he left the film, that idea of Ant Man being an outsider to the MCU has seemingly become part of the characters charm. When Scott Lang was recruited to fight alongside Captain America and his forces in Captain America: Civil War, he gave the impression of somebody who never thought they’d get to play in the big leagues but who now was playing short stop. Although he found himself on the losing side of that battle which had consequences that echo throughout this movie, you notice that Scott is still the center focus of the film instead of a project oversaturated with Marvel cameos and Easter eggs. Some of the best Marvel movies or projects such as Iron Man, Captain America: Winter Soldier, Spider-Man: Homecoming or the Netflix and/or Hulu series worked so well because they were character dominant stories that focused on the individual heroes and their conflicts. The cast and crew of this latest Marvel installment avoid the sequel slump that plagued Iron Man and Thor by delivering a unique, hilarious and unconventional comic book movie which serves as a palate cleanser for those still recovering from Avengers: Infinity War.


It’s been two years since the events of Civil War and already we find Scott Lang has been using his time well in an adorable and creative makeshift Ant Man adventure alongside his daughter Cassie. Days away from being released from house arrest and eager to continue his life without the charming but naïve agent Jimmy Woo monitoring his every move, he receives a peculiar vision involving his estranged mentor’s wife Janet who he may have met during his brief time in the Quantum Realm. He makes a call and just like that, he finds himself back with Hope and Hank who ignore his attempts to apologize for they have been busy while on the run. Hank believes they might be able to get to the Quantum Realm to rescue Janet and Hope has been assisting her father while training to be the new Wasp. Evangeline Lily practically glows as the Wasp and her entire performance is amazing combined with Paul Rudd’s comedic charm. Her action scenes flow effortlessly whether she’s battling thugs in a kitchen or zipping in and out of a car to retrieve a shrunken laboratory. Co-Creator Stan Lee commented that he found it difficult at times to write stories involving Ant-Man and the Wasp due to the complications of writing stories where size and perception could change randomly. In this movie, director Peyton Reed uses it to his advantage. Wasp changes her size consistently within minutes while Scott’s technical difficulties make for some of the more hilarious moments in the film especially the scene where they have infiltrate Cassie’s school to retrieve Scott’s original Ant Man suit. Michael Douglas’ gruff demeanor is perfect whether he’s breaking up the romantic tension between Hope and Scott or dropping hilarious commentary on the current events which have become the everyday fabric of his life.I don’t think anybody has handled talking to his estranged wife through another man in such a calm and sentimental demeanor. And of course where Ant-Man be without one of Luis’s long but hilarious recapping of current events? It’s just like T.I said when one of the antagonists tries to interrupt our fast talking narrator “ You put in the money so now you gotta go along for the ride”.

They say a movie’s hero is only as good as its villain but this movie is special for the reason that I believe it doesn’t have a main villain but rather antagonists; characters who’s goals interfere with the plans of our heroes thus bringing them into conflict. Sonny Birch and his associates are just your run of the mill thugs with Birch being a criminal businessman who wants to get ahead of the competition in the black market and isn’t afraid of using “truth serum” or informants to do so . They make for entertaining banter and effective opponents during the wonderfully choreographed car chase near the end of the film. Hannah John-Kamen takes Ava Starr’s Ghost in a completely different direction than the comic’s version of the character.

Instead of being an anti-capitalist saboteur whose obsession and powers isolates them from the world, Hannah’s performance as a tortured child-turned-weapon whose powers are literally killing her makes her sympathetic instead of clique or one-dimensional. Although she is a trained operative of the now-defunct S.H.I.E.L.D, it’s the humanity and anger of Hannah’s performance that makes us sympathize with her and her surrogate father, Bill Foster played by Lawrence Fishburne. Both of them connected in a way to Hank Pym’s work, one by a failed experiment and the other by a failed working relationship, and yet they clearly care for each other. Ava lashed out in pain and frustration because that’s not only all she knows but she is afraid of dying. Bill wants to help her even when her condition pushes the limits of his knowledge and when she considers kidnapping Cassie in order to draw Scott out, he puts his foot down and tells her no, like any concerned father when his child is considering a decision they can’t come back from. Although I would have liked to have seen more regarding Bill and project Goliath, a reference to the superhero identity his comic counterpart carries, I did find it refreshing that both Bill and Ava managed to remain alive at the end of the film. Considering how Marvel movies have a habit of killing their villains at the end, it was nice to see Ant-Man and the Wasp avoid that tradition. If anything the real overarching villain in this and other Marvel movies are modern day government or terrorist organizations like S.H.I.E.L.D and HYDRA who take in individuals like Ava and make them into weapons only to cast them aside once they serve their purpose or abandon them when their group dissolves for whatever reason. Once Ava regains her life with the help of the returned Janet Van Dyne, she’s eager to turn herself in or run but Bill reminds her that for once in her life, she’s not alone and they flee together. Sometimes even villains can get some amalgamation of a happy ending, even just for one day.

In the end, the true unspoken hero of Ant-Man and the Wasp is Cassie Lang. Without her, Scott Lang would have never performed the heist that put him on the path to become the second Ant-Man in both the movies and the comics. She has always been his first priority and Abby Ryder Fortson plays her with just the right balance of innocence and humor she clearly learned from her dad. In this movie, his goal is keeping out of trouble long enough to see her outside of his house and in true Marvel fashion, that puts him at odds with both of his careers.  When his actions seem to have jeopardized Hank and Hope’s plans to save Janet, Cassie sits next to him and tells him that she know he’s Ant Man again but more importantly that she loves him and wants him to do right by his friends, especially his new partner. I found her disappointment about her dad wanting Hope as his partner in the field instead of her  adorable in the way that it reminds me of how she becomes the hero Stature years later in the comics which I would love for them to explore in later films.  Cassie Lang presence reinforces that one of the main themes of Ant-Man and the Wasp is family. We see the lengths that Scott will resort to maintain but also protect his family similar to the journey that Hank Pym and Hope aspire in order to rescue someone they thought they had lost forever or how far Bill Foster was willing to go to save Ava. These are the kind of decisions anybody would do for someone they care about or love regardless of any risks, doubts or dangers. Even at the end before our feel good happy ending is ended with one hell of a cliffhanger, our heroes were journeying back into the Quantum Realm to further help Ava and her condition because that’s what heroes do: they put their entire world on the line to help preserve every single one of ours. Although the traditional mid credits scene tragically answered where both heroes were during the events of Infinity War, I overall enjoyed the film and hope that Marvel will continue to push the envelope with their characters and how their movies can be. Until then, I’ll just keep wondering what other names Scott can come up for his faithful ant soldiers.

Also the Stan Lee cameo was as always awesome: ” Well 60’s were fun but now I’m paying for it”

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The Legacy of Steve Ditko

The Legacy of Steve Ditko

Posted by on Jul 7, 2018 in Opinion, Uncategorized


Yesterday comic book legend Steve Ditko passed away at 90 years old and with his passing, he leaves behind a legacy of impressive and unique characters who pushed the boundaries of comics and comic book storytelling. With an remarkable resume from both mainstream and independent companies alike, Ditko spent much of his later years as “the J.D. Salinger of comics” who rarely made appearances but kept his Manhattan studio where he continued to write and draw up until his death. Many creators have attributed Ditko’s work and style as an inspiration and honestly, the comic book industry would not be where it is today without him.


It was his father who inspired his love of comics and Steve Ditko grew up reading such comics as Prince Valiant, Batman and the Spirit before enlisting in the army where he contributed artwork for a military paper in post-war Germany. After he was discharged, he moved in New York in the 1950s and studied under legendary Batman artist Jerry Robinson in the Cartoonist and Illustrator School (later known as the School of Visual Arts). Robinson would remark being very impressed with Steve’s work ethic and dedication and it was there that editor of Atlas Comics Stan Lee, who was a guest speaker for Robinson’s class, was first introduced to Ditko’s work. Ditko’s early work would be as an inker in Joe Simon and Jack Kirby’s studio alongside artist Mort Meskin, the beginning of his longstanding relationship with Charlton Comics, but it was his work at Atlas Comics later known as Marvel Comics that would lead to greatness. His work Journey of Mystery, Tales of Suspense, and Tales to Astonish were great but his work in Amazing Adventures marked the first in his collaborations with Stan Lee. These small collaborations would lay down the groundwork for what would be known as the “Marvel Method” of comic book storytelling where Lee would give details of the plot and then Ditko would do the rest.


In the early 1960s, Ditko was approached by Stan Lee about a new kind of superhero he was working on called Spider-Man. Ditko worked on the costume, the motif and small details involving the character who debuted in Amazing Fantasy #15 and history was made. Originally stating that he would continue to draw Spider-Man “if nothing better comes along”, Lee and Ditko created many of Spider-Man’s most iconic adversaries including Doctor Octopus, Mysterio, the Lizard, Electro and the infamous Green Goblin. Ditko eventually would demand plot credit for his work performed under the Marvel method and was granted this, a notable achievement considering the difficulty many early comic book artists had asserting ownership for characters they helped create for major companies years later. During his run on Amazing Spider-Man, his work on Issue #33 contained a single page depicting one of the most iconic images in Spider-Man history

and he would find a near equal amount of success in his next collaboration with Stan Lee, the Sorcerer Supreme known as Doctor Strange in 1963. Ditko’s mystical landscapes and elaborate, psychedelic visuals pushed his work to another level unseen by comics at that time as it was a favorite of college students and emphasized the mood and anxiety of the stories’ characters. Although he would forever be remembered for the work he performed in those four years at Marvel, he left after a rumored dispute between him and Stan Lee and would not return until 1979.


Over the next ten to twenty years, Ditko would work on a great number of characters in multiple companies. At Charlton Comics, he worked on Blue Beetle, the Question and Captain Atom, all three characters he had co-created in the 1960s. He worked for a short time at DC Comics, co-creating the eccentric vigilante The Creeper and the duo Hawk and Dove before leaving to work with Charlton Comics again until 1974.

When he returned to DC in 1975, he created Shade the Changing Man, created the fantasy series titled Stalker, revived the Creeper, worked on the Legion of Superheroes and co-created the Prince Gavyn Starman with Paul Levitz in 1980. After returning to Marvel, he worked on a few titles and created the young hero Speedball but for much of the 1980s and 1990s he would freelance with Marvel and other independent companies producing all matter of series and characters with mixed commercial reactions, one of his most successful series being Mr. A which was heavily inspired by Ayn Rand’s philosophy about Objectivism . One of his last original characters for Marvel would be the loveable Squirrel Girl in 1992 but the kind of work Ditko was producing wasn’t finding the market it once had and he retired in 1998.

In 2008, a New York Times article had this to say about Ditko and his career post retirement “By the ’70s he was regarded as a slightly old-fashioned odd-ball; by the ’80s he was a commercial has-been, picking up wretched work-for-hire gigs. … Ditko hacked out moneymaking work, saving his care for the crabbed Objectivist screeds he published with tiny presses. And boy, could Ditko hack: seeing samples of his Transformers coloring book and his Big Boy comic is like hearing Orson Welles sell frozen peas.”


Despite retiring from mainstream comics, Steve Ditko continued to write and draw with most of his solo work published intermittently by Robin Snyder who had been his editor at Charlton, Archie Comics, and other companies in the 1980s. Collections of his work were occasionally published throughout the early 2000s while he claimed to maintain a tense relationship with Marvel regarding compensation for the characters he created being used in film and television. He continued to work in the Midtown West neighborhood and usually declined to do interviews or make public appearances up until his death this year, claiming “When I do a job, it’s not my personality that I’m offering the readers but my artwork. It’s not what I’m like that counts; it’s what I did and how well it was done. I produce a product, a comic art story. Steve Ditko is the brand name”. Despite the rocky state of his career in his later years, comics and their storytelling could not have accomplished what they have without Steve Ditko’s influence. His early artwork, no matter its date, continues to inspire future creators with its style and creativity and while I respect his desire for privacy and how he viewed his work, I wish fans such as myself could have gotten the opportunity to thank him in person for how much his work meant and inspired others. Thank you, Mr. Ditko and I hope you find the peace that you deserve.

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Crisis of Infinite Weddings: Batman and Catwoman

Crisis of Infinite Weddings: Batman and Catwoman

Posted by on Jul 6, 2018 in Home, News, Opinion, Uncategorized


Marriage is no small decision. When writer Tom King had Bruce Wayne unmask and propose to Selina Kyle, it was an unexpected conclusion to an intense and near fatal victory from the vengeful and meticulous Bane. Batman has always been one of DC Comics strongest characters – primarily because he is a walking paradox of tragedy and willpower. By choosing to become Batman, he entered into a  symbolic matrimony that would be for better or for worse until victory or death. So when he proposed to Catwoman many were skeptical. Tom King, alongside many talented artists, put both characters through every kind of gauntlet the DC universe could offer and still they remained together. Because deep down, we believe in Batman and we want to believe he can be happy even if we know he cannot. Before the issue was even in stores, online spoilers confirmed there was no marriage, making this the second comic book wedding this year to end in disappointment and frustration. This recent failure of buildup with an unsatisfying conclusion continues to give the incorrect impression that comic book characters are unable to commit to the expectations of marriage. Yes folks, they can save the world again and again but walking down the altar and saying ” I do”  may be too much for our heroes to handle.

Just like Kitty Pryde and Colossus’ wedding at Marvel, the entire issue is spent building up to the big moment. The main story drawn beautifully by Batman Rebirth collaborator Michael Janin shows Bruce and Selina’s  building up to the ceremony tied together with their individual letters narrating their thoughts and feelings to each other. The issue is scattered with pages from various artists who have contributed to Batman throughout the years but with little to no contribution to the main story, it appears just as a ploy to  justify the issues $4.99 sales price.

It was right around the point where Selina’s friend Holly starts suggesting that maybe Batman can’t be married and be happy that I started to get déjà vu, as if some of the plot points from Kitty and Piotr’s failed marriage had made their way over to Batman. While Tom King’s current narrative in Batman has been strong and full of great character moments, Bruce’s  talk with Alfred being one of the strongest in this issue, I found myself wishing more was shown instead of being told. Instead of Selina telling Bruce that she couldn’t marry him in a letter and why, I would have liked a conversation between the two of them discussing this. Selina has had all sorts of people discuss her relationship with Batman, even a one-on-one with the Joker, but she remained steadfast in her decision until now. She has seen more of Bruce Wayne than most partners ever did but it takes one conversation to unhinge her faith in their love; she believes marrying Bruce will rob Batman of the necessary drive that allows him to help others.  Just like Batman loses his bride, we lose our hope in Batman ever finding a happy ending. There has been 25 issues, tie-ins, press and work invested into this and in the end  they just didn’t go through with it? It is completely frustrating because they had you believing it was gonna happen. You believed the hype so much that you didn’t see the rug pulled under your feet until it was too late. Now you feel foolish for even believing it could happen in the first place. In the end, this event ruined marriage for Batman the way  Death of Superman ruined death for all superheroes.


This disappointment continues a trend in comics over the last few years that comic book characters apparently can’t handle stable relationships. Their lifestyle does not allow for the kind of happiness and stability necessary for a relationship or a family and I think that’s absurd. In certain circumstances, it’s been absolutely entertaining watching Superman juggle a family and its responsibilities or watch Batman trying to be a father and also Batman. It takes them out of their element and adds a certain humor to the high stakes intensity and seriousness that is as much their lives as the capes and tights. Regarding Bruce and Selina, they are still Batman and Catwoman and writer Tom King has shown this continues to be a part of his overall story so this moment will not be overlooked for it simply the end of the current chapter.

Will Bruce and Selina attempt to discuss what happened and where to go from there? Probably but I don’t understand why such moments couldn’t have been explored or explained better and that’s where most of my frustration is focused. By denying us those experiences, the readers are robbed of a better way to understand and identify with the characters. The event had such buildup and momentum behind it and it just fizzled before our eyes. It could have been different and it should have been discovered by fans who waited at their stores until midnight or went the next day to buy the issue instead of spoiled days before by reputable news sources who should know better. Regardless if you were rooting for or against them, no matter how disappointed you are or who you’d like to blame for this turn of events, we don’t have to like it but as always, we move forward and hope for something better tomorrow. In the end we still have Batman and as Kite Man would say, hell yeah.

Here’s remembering the time she almost got ‘im!

 

 

 

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Recommended Reading for Ant Man and the Wasp

Recommended Reading for Ant Man and the Wasp

Posted by on Jul 3, 2018 in Home, News, Source Material, Uncategorized

With Ant Man and the Wasp only two days away, I thought some recommended reading might help those who want to be familiar with Marvels tiniest heroes before they drop on the big screen. Now these are only a few of the stories out there since Ant-Man and the Wasp’s debut in Tales to Astonish #27 and #44 in the early 1960s or Scott Lang’s debut in Avengers #181 at the end of the 1970s but hey you gotta start somewhere and these I thought were some of the best introductions.

1. Ant-Man: Scott Lang: This collection has a lot of the early appearances of Scott Lang as Ant-Man. You can see him working alongside other Marvel heroes such as Iron Man, Fantastic Four, the Avengers and Spider-Man. Lang would later play an important role in the Armor Wars story-line but this collection highlights two story-lines that will be explored in this upcoming film. One story had him assisting Yellowjacket (Hank Pym) to rescue the captured Wasp and another had him working alongside the FF to journey toward a “micro-world” where he would assist the famous family in battle with the forces of Doctor Doom. Both the rescue and journey to a micro-world aka the Quantum Realm are important, but this collection shows how Lang interacts with the other heroes in the Marvel Universe. Considering both Ant-Man and the Wasp will be appearing in the Avengers: Infinity War sequel in 2019 and that Scott Lang would eventually be an Avenger in the comics, reading up on how the groundwork for such relationships began may be good for anyone still unfamiliar with the size altering hero.

2. Shadowland: Thunderbolts: While this Luke Cage assembled Thunderbolts, a team of criminals forced to work together for the common good, had their own specific missions, the movie’s villain Ghost was among their members having served previously on Norman Osborn’s Thunderbolts before betraying him during Siege. Issue #151 offered a possible origin story for Ghost, specifically who he was and how he became to be. Tragic and brutal, this possible origin for a blank slate in the Marvel universe is interesting to say the least of a character who began as an Iron Man villain. Although actress Hannah John-Kamen’s interpretation of the character will be unique to itself, this character and its evolution from a villain to an anti-hero with good intentions is great for anyone unfamiliar with this obscure character.

3. Ant/Man Giant Man: The Man in the Ant Hill: Before Scott Lang, there was Dr. Henry “Hank” Pym and his wife Janet Van Dyne aka Ant-Man and the Wasp. Although co-creator Stan Lee said that it was a struggle to find place for Ant-Man in the Avengers at times, both characters were established in Marvel’s Tales to Astonish series and later as founding members of the famous superhero team. During their brief membership, Ant-Man would switch identities, the first of many changes in Hank Pym’s career, to Giant Man. Although Hank and Janet’s time as both characters have clearly passed since their introduction in Ant-Man (2016), video footage of both in action proved they were quite the formidable team. As one of the main plot points deals with the attempt to rescue Janet from the Quantum Realm, familiarity with Hank and Janet during the Golden Age of Comics might be a nice trip down memory lane while also seeing how far comic book storytelling has come since then.

4. Black Goliath #1-5: Bill Foster was originally introduced in Avengers #32 as Hank Pym’s lab assistant but it wasn’t until Luke Cage: Power Man #24 that he became known as Black Goliath. Dr. Foster moved to the West Coast where he was able to crack the formula to Pym particles which gave him similar powers to Giant-Man. Taking the name Black Goliath, he fought a variety of villains while working alongside other heroes like the Champions, the Defenders, and the Thing. This short-lived series was unfortunately published at a time when there was a paper shortage meaning Marvel had to cancel any low selling series almost immediately. Fortunately, Bill continued to make appearances in Marvel Two-In-One and eventually became a member of the West Coast Avengers before losing his powers. With Lawrence Fishburne playing the role of Bill Foster in the movie and the mention of project Goliath,  we could be seeing another Giant-Man in the MCU future so brushing up on his history might be helpful.

5. Astonishing Ant Man: Trial of Ant-Man: There have been a few Ant-Man series since the characters debut in the 1960s and Nick Spencer’s run of Astonishing Ant Man is the latest but by far one of the more successful fan favorite series. Balancing the popular consensus of the character from the MCU movies with the humor and wit he displayed in the Superior Foes of Spider-Man, writer Nick Spencer puts Scott Lang in a tough situation and just turns up the heat. When Darren Cross, Crossfire and company kidnap his daughter Cassie, Scott must enlist the help of villainous co-workers to break into Darren’s company and save Cassie. After the battle, Scott is arrested for his participation in the matter and for violating his parole and he sits in jail awaiting trial. Caught between a rock and a hard place with limited options, Scott’s situation has certain parallels with the predicament’s Paul Rudd’s Scott Lang faces in the upcoming movie. He is under house arrest because of his choices in Civil War which have resulted in greater tension between him, Hank, and Hope. He wants to be a good father to Cassie but can’t deny his responsibilities as Ant-Man even when those decisions make his life even more difficult. I’d say Nick Spencer’s good but short series Astonishing Ant Man is a great read for modern readers who want to get into comics but don’t have the time to invest in years of continuity.

So that’s some of the great Ant Man and Wasp stories out there so if you like them and want to read more of Scott Lang, Hank Pym, and Janet Van Dyne’s adventures, go check our your nearest comic book shop or book store. Until then, keep it real and watch out for seagulls.

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Source Material: Ant-Man and the Wasp Comics

Source Material: Ant-Man and the Wasp Comics

Posted by on Jul 3, 2018 in Home, News, Source Material, Uncategorized

Hey everybody! We’re only a few days away from the premiere of Ant-Man and the Wasp, the sequel to 2016’s Ant-Man. A lot has changed since Scott Lang inherited the mantle of Ant Man from secluded inventor Hank Pym in an unorthodox fashion and as we saw at the end of the first movie, he has some company or as Hope van Dyne put it “It’s about damn time”. The film takes place two years after the events in Civil War but before the events of Infinity War so it may answer questions about why we didn’t see either heroes alongside their fellow Marvel heroes battling against Thanos and his forces. The film will explore a new adversary code-named the Ghost, fellow inventor and former Pym co-worker Bill Foster, and the status of Janet Van Dyne who disappeared in the Quantum Realm years ago.

Our Characters:

Scott Lang/ Ant-Man: A former criminal and father who tried to help his daughter’s poor health by rescuing a doctor who could help her from CEO Darren Cross. To do this, he stole Hank Pym’s suit and cannisters of Pym particles which gave him the powers Hank Pym was known for. After he defeated Cross, he tried to return the suit and turn himself in but Hank Pym, aware of his reasons and his actions as a result, instead allowed him to keep the suit and title under the condition he works as a hero. Scott has worked alongside the Avengers and other Marvel superheroes but always tried to balance a career as a superhero and a father. Wonderfully portrayed by actor Paul Rudd, this movie portrays Lang under house arrest due to his actions during Civil War and attempting to fix his frayed relationship with Hank Pym and Hope while balancing his responsibilities as Ant Man and to his daughter Cassie.

 

 

Hope van Dyne/ the Wasp: the daughter of Hank Pym and Janet Van Dyne, the original Ant Man and Wasp. While there are similarities to her comic book character, I find this version of the Wasp to have more in common with Nakia Pym, the illegitimate child of Hank Pym and deceased foreign agent Maria Trovaya. Nakia grew up in the Soviet Red Room and upon escape, she learned of her father’s death and created a makeshift Wasp costume to fight alongside the Avengers. She would find a surrogate mother in Janet Van Dyne and eventually adopted her last name when she became a U.S. Citizen. In the movie, Janet’s disappearance during a mission created friction and distance between Hank and Hope that began to heal throughout the first movie. Portrayed delightfully by actress Evangeline Lily, the actress believes that by accepting the mantle of the Wasp, Hope has achieved a goal she’s wished for for most of her life as well assertion from her father, so she will be in a different emotional mindset than she was previously.

Dr. Henry “Hank” Pym/ the original Ant-Man: The scientist who was also known as Giant Man, Goliath, Yellowjacket and even the Wasp. One of the founding members of the Avengers, Hank Pym’s heroic history has been mired with controversial decisions and consequences. It was Hank Pym who was responsible for creating the android menace called Ultron and years later he suffered a mental breakdown that caused him to attack his teammates and physically assault his wife Janet. As a result, he was expelled from the Avengers and Janet divorced him although they would rekindle their romance years later. The movie version of Hank Pym is an inventor, entomologist, physicist and former S.H.I.E.L.D agent who was the original Ant-Man back in 1963. Portrayed by actor Michael Douglas who channels the cynicism and distrust Hank views the world into his role as Scott’s mentor, the film will explore how Scott’s decisions in Civil War has affected him and Hope and his desire to return to the Quantum Realm in search of his wife Janet whom he believes is still alive.

The Ghost: A brilliant criminal who gains the ability to phase through technology after stealing Pym technology. In the comics, the Ghost origin story is unknown. He claimed to be a promising programmer and engineer whose technology skyrocketed his employer Omnisapient. Depressed over the death of his girlfriend to a random fire, he found solace by literally immersing his consciousness into the data networks he created by wiring his flesh to his advanced processors. With his mind elevated to alpha-level intelligence he discovered that his lover had been hired by the company to keep him happy and was killed because of her attempts to blackmail them. When he was discovered, the company hired a mercenary to dispose of him with a bomb that destroyed his entire apartment complex and its residents. He survived and became the Ghost, an anti-capitalist saboteur who seeks to destroy any corporation or institution that he views as oppressive, with a suit that grants him the ability to become intangible and hack and reprogram any electronic system or signal. He destroyed his former employers and then erased any form of his former life. If this is true or not has yet to be confirmed. In the movie, the writers decided that the characters gender was irrelevant to its portrayal and that it would be more interesting to cast the role as a woman; the actress Hannah John-Kamen felt the blank slate allowed her to make the character her own. It has been hinted that there is some connection to Ghost and friend and former Pym co-worker Bill Foster.

 

Bill Foster: A former assistant and partner to Hank Pym on the Goliath project. In the comics, Bill Foster worked alongside Hank Pym as his lab assistant and eventually cracked the formula for the Pym particles which gave Giant-Man (Hank Pym’s identity at the time) the ability to grow. Originally known as Black Goliath, he worked alongside the Champions, the Defenders, and other Marvel characters as Giant Man and constantly dealt with his powers in flux. He went by Goliath when he was killed during a battle in Civil War and his nephew Tom would crack the formula for Pym particles and honor his memory as the new Goliath. In the movie, Bill Foster is played by Laurence Fishburne who is seen comparing his experience in Project Goliath with Scott Lang’s experiences in the trailer. Director Paul Reed has described the current rivalry between Foster and Pym to that of tech moguls Steve Jobs and Bill Gates.

Cassie Lang: Scott Lang’s daughter. In the comics, repeated exposure to the Pym Particles from her father’s adventures as Ant-Man helped Cassie gain the ability to increase and decrease her size. Her abilities were usually linked to her emotions and she would work alongside the Young Avengers and with other Marvel heroes under the code-name Stature. Her love for her father and his other career would constantly put her at odds with her mother and stepfather who feared for her safety and life. Although she is just a child currently in Scott’s early career as Ant-Man, such a plot point would be interesting to explore in possible future movies.

 

Janet Van Dyne/ The Original Wasp: Hank Pym’s wife and mother to Hope Van Dyne. She was lost in the Quantum Realm during a mission years ago with Hank. She has not been seen since…. until now. It was rumored until it was confirmed that she will be portrayed by Michelle Pfeiffer.

And of course Luis, Dave, and Kurt who were members of Scott Lang’s original crew will be returning as well as Maggie and Paxton, Scott’s ex-wife and her current husband. With a cast of characters such as this, this most definitely will not be any kind of small movie.

 

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Infinity Warps: Marvel’s latest What-If

Infinity Warps: Marvel’s latest What-If

Posted by on Jun 28, 2018 in Home, News, Opinion, Uncategorized

Comic books are a creative format where writers and artists can tell stories with fictional characters in a variety of ways. While there is a constant mainstream continuity within either DC or Marvel, that hasn’t stopped creators from contemplating different stories; hypothetical different outcomes of important comic events, roads not traveled by for classic characters or new characters put in new, unfamiliar scenarios. At DC Comics they were called Elseworlds in the 1990s and Marvel called them their What If’s. Although both formats had a variety of successful creators telling stories, the latter have been stories told in brief formats with decent success. As a Marvel fan, I’ve noted or read of these stories online but my interest has never gone beyond that; a brief synopsis seemed cool enough to note but not actually own. Marvel seemed to have better success with such story-lines as the 2099 universe or the Ultimate Universe in the past but its latest mini-series dubbed Infinity Warps not only connects to the upcoming Infinity Wars event but also continuing Marvel’s What If story-lines in a new refreshing fashion.


Infinity Wars ( not to be confused with the 1995 Infinity War sequel to 1993 Infinity Gauntlet) is the upcoming Marvel event dealing with the reemergence of the Infinity Gems which readers have not seen since their use in 2015’s Secret Wars and the conflict that comes with those that wield them. While this story-line has been connected to Wolverine’s surprise resurrection, last seeing dying in 2014, the use of the Reality Gem may be responsible for these Infinity Warp story-lines which mash up two distinct Marvel characters to be one.

                                  

Already two miniseries have been announced : Infinity Warps: Iron Hammer, an Iron Man/Thor mashup by Loki: Agent of Asgard/ Ultimates writer Al Ewing and artist Ramon Rosanas; and Infinity Warps: Soldier Supreme, a mixture of Captain America and Doctor Strange by Infinity Countdown/Deadpool writer Gerry Duggan and Avengers/Champions superstar artist Adam Kubert. Although both series are only two issues, concept and cover artist Humberto Ramos, one of Dan Slott’s collaborators on Amazing Spider-Man, Mike Carey’s X-Men, etc, has teased on his Twitter that there are a few other collaborations on the way.

Now some may see this short format of two issues to be nothing worth noting but one may recall that Spider- Gwen started off as an issue in the Edge of the Spider-Verse and its success earned her an individual mini-series. Although these mash-ups probably caused by the Infinity Gem may prove to be temporary, it shows that Marvel still has some creativity playing ground to work within. These mashups remind me of the Amalgam Universe which spun out of 1996 DC vs Marvel which gave us some of the best mashups of classic characters that we’ve ever seen. These mashups over two very different characters could create interesting clashes of personalities from what we know but overall, I really can’t wait to read that Ghost Rider/Black Panther mash up when it hits the store. Considering that Marvel could use some good news since they’ve taken quite a bit of criticism lately, this deviation from an possibly uninteresting story-line sounds fun and worth looking into. I guess sometimes you can teach a dog new tricks.

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